Staff FREEPDG 2019-2021 (Ch 12-14)

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
According to AFI 1-1, Air Force Standards, "fiscal fitness" is important to the overall well-being of Air Force members. Two keys aspects of individual financial responsibility are: (12.1.)
A. waiver and remiss

C. making a personal budget and managing one's debt

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
This is the fundamental component of military pay and typically the largest component of a member's pay. (12.2.)
A. per diem
B. basic pay
C. special and incentive pay
D. Basic Allowance for Housing

B. basic pay

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Annual military pay raises are set by: (12.2.)
A. public law
B. the Joint Chiefs of Staff
C. the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS)
D. Congress and the President in the National Defense Authorization

D. Congress and the President in the National Defense Authorization Act

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Annual military pay raises are set by Congress and the President in the National Defense Authorization Act. In accordance with Federal Law, the 1 January annual pay raise will automatically match: (12.2.)
A. TS

C. private sector wage increases

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay date is important because it: (12.2.)
A. determines eligibility for VA benefits
B. establishes rank and precedence among NCOs
C. determines the length of service for pay purposes
D. provides a

C. determines the length of service for pay purposes

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay date is important because it determines the length of service for pay purposes. In general, the pay date should be the same date the individual: (12.2.)
A. elected to retire
B. spoke to a recru

C. entered on Regular Air Force status

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
In general, the military pay date should be the same date the individual entered on Regular Air Force status if he or she: (12.2.)
A. was not a naturalized citizen
B. chose to serve the 6-year initial term
C. h

C. had no prior service before entering the Air Force

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay date is important because it determines the length of service for pay purposes. However, periods of absence without leave, desertion, and sickness or injury due to personal misconduct may resul

C. a negative pay date adjustment

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
This is a comprehensive statement of a member's entitlements, deductions, allotments, leave information, taxwithholdings, and Thrift Savings Plan information. (12.3.)
A. Personal Information File (PIF)
B. DFAS

B. DFAS Form 702, DFAS Military Leave and Earnings Statement

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Military members are paid on a monthly basis with the option to receive payments: (12.3.)
A. annually
B. weekly or monthly
C. once or twice per month
D. monthly, quarterly, or semi-annually

C. once or twice per month

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Members receive two financial statements every month, one at mid-month and one at the end of the month. The one received mid-month is: (12.3.)
A. the LES
B. net pay advice
C. a partial payment
D. Thrift Savings

B. net pay advice

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Members receive two financial statements every month, one at mid-month and one at the end of the month. The one received at the end of the month is: (12.3.)
A. the LES
B. net pay advice
C. a partial payment
D.

A. the LES

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Members receive a statement (net pay advice) of the amount of pay at mid-month (if receiving a payment), and a comprehensive statement of pay (the LES) at the end of the month. These statements are created cent

C. Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS)

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay system has processing cutoff dates that affect updates to pay accounts. The cutoff date is: (12.3.)
A. the day Finance is closed for training
B. the anniversary of the member's enlistment
C. th

D. the day DFAS stops processing transactions against pay accounts for the current period

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The cutoff date is the day DFAS stops processing transactions against pay accounts for the current period. While the cutoff dates fluctuate from month to month, they're generally around _______. (12.3.)
A. 3 da

C. the 6th for the mid-month and the 20th for the end-of-month payday

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay system allows for Local, Partial, and Emergency Partial payments. Local cash payments are normally only authorized for: (12.3.)
A. officers and Senior NCOs
B. members on unaccompanied short tou

D. overseas areas where military banking facilities are not readily available

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay system allows for Local, Partial, and Emergency Partial payments. A member's commander may authorize immediate cash payments of up to _______. (12.3.)
A. $3,500
B. the amount of accrued entitle

B. the amount of accrued entitlement to date

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay system allows for Local, Partial, and Emergency Partial payments. Partial payments are limited to: (12.3.)
A. $3,500
B. three times the member's base pay
C. the amount of pay and allowances the

C. the amount of pay and allowances the member has accrued to the date of the payment

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Under the military pay system, partial payments are limited to the amount of pay and allowances the member has accrued to the date of the payment. Partial payments are recouped in full: (12.3.)
A. upon separati

C. on the next available payday

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The military pay system allows for Local, Partial, and Emergency Partial payments. When may emergency partial payments be made to a stateside member? (12.3.)
A. on the next available payday
B. when military ban

D. within 24 hours if deemed time-sensitive and due to unforeseen circumstances

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs such as food or housing. Monetary allowances are provided: (12.4.)
A. only when stationed overseas
B. if the member experiences a financial hardship
C. to support memb

D. when the government does not provide for that specific need

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs such as food or housing and are not taxable. The exception is: (12.4.)
A. Family Separation Allowance
B. Basic Allowance for Housing
C. CONUS cost-of-living allowance

C. CONUS cost-of-living allowance

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs such as food or housing. Which allowance is paid to offset the cost of a service member's meals? (12.4.)
A. Family Separation Allowance
B. Basic Allowance for Housing

D. Basic Allowance for Subsistence

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs such as food or housing. The intent of basic allowance for housing is to: (12.4.)
A. offset the cost of a service member's meals
B. provide housing compensation based

B. provide housing compensation based on local housing costs

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs such as food or housing. Which allowance is paid to members without dependents residing in government single-type quarters unless the quarters exceed the minimum stand

B. partial Basic Allowance for Housing

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs such as food or housing. Which allowance may be paid to members living in single-type government quarters who pay court-ordered child support? (12.4.)
A. Basic Allowan

D. Basic Allowance for Housing-differential

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The location determines whether the housing allowance is BAH or overseas housing allowance (OHA). The difference between BAH and OHA is: (12.4.)
A. OHA is not taxable while BAH is taxed at the same rate as base

C. BAH is based on average costs while OHA reimburses actual rental costs

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
OHA is a cost reimbursement-based allowance to help defray housing costs incident to assignments outside the United States. There are two types of allowances paid under OHA: (12.4.)
A. CRA Basic and CRA Standar

B. Move-in housing allowance (MIHA) and monthly OHA

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
There are two types of allowances paid under OHA: Move-in housing allowance (MIHA) and monthly OHA. MIHA is based on: (12.4.)
A. actual move-in costs
B. increases in private sector wages
C. the average "move-in

C. the average "move-in" costs for members

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The purpose of Family Separation Housing allowance (FSH) is to pay a member for: (12.4.)
A. TDY expenses that exceed per diem
B. accepting the accompanied long overseas tour
C. housing costs incident to assignm

D. added housing expenses resulting from separation from dependents

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Which allowance pays a member for added housing expenses resulting from enforced separation from dependents? (12.4.)
A. Overseas Housing Allowance
B. Basic Allowance for Housing
C. CONUS cost-of-living allowanc

D. Family Separation Housing allowance

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
There are two types of Family Separation Housing allowance (FSH): FSH-BAH and FSH-OHA. FSH-BAH is payable in a monthly amount equal to: (12.4.)
A. the average rental cost, not actual expense
B. the actual renta

D. the without-dependent BAH rate applicable to the member's grade and permanent duty station

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
There are two types of Family Separation Housing allowance (FSH): FSH-BAH and FSH-OHA. FSH-OHA is payable in a monthly amount up to: (12.4.)
A. the average rental cost, not actual expense
B. the actual rental c

C. the without-dependent OHA rate applicable to the member's grade and permanent duty station

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Enlisted members receive an annual Clothing Replacement Allowance (CRA) to help maintain, repair, and replace uniform items. There are two types of Clothing Replacement Allowance: (12.5.)
A. CRA CONUS and CRA O

B. CRA Basic and CRA Standar

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
There are two types of Clothing Replacement Allowance (CRA): CRA Basic and CRA Standard. When is CRA Basic paid? (12.5.)
A. in monthly installments
B. when the member departs PCS
C. upon entering a second enlis

D. annually, between the 6th and 36th month of Regular Air Force status

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
There are two types of Clothing Replacement Allowance (CRA): CRA Basic and CRA Standard. CRA Standard automatically replaces CRA Basic: (12.5.)
A. when the member is selected for E-5
B. during assignments outsi

C. after 36 months of Regular Air Force status

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Enlisted members receive two types of Clothing Replacement Allowance to help maintain, repair, and replace uniform items. Entitlement to either allowance depends on: (12.5.)
A. how likely they are to be capture

D. the individual's "entered on Regular Air Force status date

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The purpose of Family Separation Allowance (FSA) is to compensate members for: (12.6.)
A. pain and suffering caused by a hardship assignment
B. housing costs incident to assignments outside the CONUS
C. added e

C. added expenses incurred due to an enforced family separation

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The purpose of Family Separation Allowance (FSA) is to compensate members for added expenses incurred due to an enforced family separation. How many types of Family Separation Allowance are there? (12.6.)
A. 3;

C. 2; FSA-restricted and FSA-temporary

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
There are two types of Family Separation Allowance (FSA): FSA-restricted and FSA-temporary. FSA-restricted is authorized for members: (12.6.)
A. who are involuntarily assigned to recruiter duty
B. serving on sh

C. when transportation of dependents is not authorized at government expense

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
There are two types of Family Separation Allowance (FSA): FSA-restricted and FSA-temporary. FSA-temporary is authorized for members: (12.6.)
A. who are involuntarily assigned to recruiter duty
B. serving on shi

D. who are TDY away from the permanent duty station continuously for more than 30 days

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs, such as food or housing. Overseas station allowances are established to: (12.7.)
A. offset the cost of a service member's meals
B. compensate members for added expens

D. help defray the higher cost of living or housing costs overseas

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs, such as food or housing. This allowance is payable to members assigned to designated "high cost" areas within the CONUS. (12.8.)
A. Family Separation Allowance
B. Bas

C. CONUS cost-of-living allowance

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Allowances are provided for specific needs, such as food or housing. Who is eligible to receive CONUS cost-of-living allowance? (12.8.)
A. members with dependents that are command-sponsored
B. permanently-assig

D. members assigned to designated "high cost" areas within the CONUS

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The CONUS cost of living allowance is payable to members assigned to designated "high cost" areas within the CONUS. For additional information, see the: (12.8.)
A. Joint Travel Regulation
B. Defense Travel Syst

A. Joint Travel Regulation

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
A number of special and incentive pays recognize certain aspects of duty. Which of the following are types of special or incentive pay? (12.9.)
A. hazardous duty pay and imminent danger pay
B. special duty assi

D. all of these answers

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Hazardous duty incentive pay, imminent danger pay, and enlistment and reenlistment bonuses are examples of what category of pay? (12.9.)
A. Deduction
B. Allowance
C. Entitlement
D. Special and Incentive Pay

D. Special and Incentive Pay

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two general categories of payroll deductions are: (12.10.)
A. temporary and permanent
B. involuntary and voluntary
C. allowances and entitlements
D. state or territory and federal

B. involuntary and voluntary

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two general categories of payroll deductions are involuntary and voluntary deductions. Involuntary deductions are: (12.10.)
A. payments intended to help replace initial issue uniform items
B. payroll deduct

B. payroll deductions of certain amounts of pay that are imposed by law

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
All pay is considered income for federal and state income tax purposes, to include: (12.10.)
A. basic pay and incentive pay
B. special pay and separation pay
C. lump-sum payment of accrued leave
D. all of these

D. all of these answers

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Federal Income Tax Withholding and State Income Tax Withholding are examples of which type of payroll deduction? (12.10)
A. voluntary
B. involuntary
C. discretionary
D. non-discretionary

B. involuntary

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two general categories of payroll deductions are involuntary and voluntary deductions. An example of an involuntary deduction is: (12.10.)
A. CFC charitable contributions
B. Armed Forces Retirement Home
C.

B. Armed Forces Retirement Home

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two categories of payroll deductions are involuntary and voluntary. An example of an involuntary deduction is the Armed Forces Retirement Home which deducts a maximum monthly amount of _______. (12.10.)
A.

A. $1

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Military members may establish voluntary deductions such as allotments to help administer their personal finances but are not authorized to start allotments for: (12.11.)
A. a personal savings program
B. the su

D. the purchase, lease, or rental of personal property

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Military members may establish voluntary deductions such as allotments to help administer their personal finances. To allow for sufficient processing time, allotments should be requested: (12.11.)
A. 30 days be

A. 30 days before the desired month

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two general categories of payroll deductions are involuntary and voluntary deductions. An example of a voluntary deduction is: (12.11.)
A. Thrift Savings Plan (TSP)
B. Armed Forces Retirement Home
C. State

A. Thrift Savings Plan (TSP)

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) is a retirement savings and investment plan established for federal employees by the: (12.11.)
A. Key West Agreement of 1948
B. National Security Act of 1947
C. Federal Employees'

C. Federal Employees' Retirement Act of 1986

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The Thrift Savings Plan is a retirement savings and investment plan established for federal employees as part of the Federal Employees' Retirement Act of 1986. The two types of Thrift Savings Plan are: (12.11.)

B. traditional and Roth

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two types of Thrift Savings Plan are traditional and Roth. The benefit of the traditional Thrift Savings Plan is: (12.11.)
A. tax obligations are reduced on the current paycheck
B. withdrawals from the TSP

A. tax obligations are reduced on the current paycheck

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two types of Thrift Savings Plan are traditional and Roth. The benefit of the Roth Thrift Savings Plan is: (12.11.)
A. tax obligations are reduced on the current paycheck
B. withdrawals from the TSP at a fu

B. withdrawals from the TSP at a future date are tax-free

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
As of January 2019, the maximum TSP contribution amount is $19,000 for deferred and Roth contributions and up to _______ total combined deferred/exempt Traditional and Roth contributions. (12.11.)
A. $17,500
B.

D. $56,000

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Members are authorized to contribute up to 92 percent of their basic pay to the Thrift Savings Plan. Members are not permitted to contribute more than 92 percent because: (12.11.)
A. of the negative effect on r

C. deductions for social security and Medicare have to be made

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The two general categories of payroll deductions are involuntary and voluntary deductions. An example of a voluntary deduction is: (12.11.)
A. Armed Forces Retirement Home
B. State Income Tax Withholding
C. Fed

D. Service Members' Group Life Insurance (SGLI)

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The maximum amount of Service Members' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) coverage is: (12.11.)
A. $250,000
B. $400,000
C. $500,000
D. $750,000

B. $400,000

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Service Members' Group Life Insurance automatically insures an eligible member against death when the member is on Regular Air Force status and/or training for an ordered period of more than _______. (12.11.)
A

A. 30 days

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
The office of primary responsibility for administering the Service Members' Group Life Insurance program is the: (12.11.)
A. finance office
B. Veterans Administration
C. military personnel section
D. Manpower a

C. military personnel section

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Military members will meet their financial obligations in a proper and timely manner. Which AFI establishes guidelines for members' financial responsibilities? (12.12.)
A. AFI 36-2905, Fitness Program
B. AFI 36

C. AFI 36-2906, Personal Financial Responsibility

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Financial complaints by civilians against military members are often addressed to the installation commander, Staff Judge Advocate, or force support squadron. The complaint is forwarded for action to _______, w

D. the individual's commander

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Financial complaints against military members are often sent to the individual's commander for action. If the member has retired: (12.12.)
A. the complaint is forwarded to AFPC
B. the complainant is told the Ai

B. the complainant is told the Air Force is unable to assist

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Financial complaints against military members are often sent to the individual's commander for action. If the member has retired, the complainant will be informed that the member is no longer under Air Force ju

D. retired members' retirement pay can be garnished for child support or alimony obligations

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
If an Air Force member owes debts to the government, the member must be notified of a pending debt collection and given a chance to repay the debt before any withholding action occurs. However, due process need

D. the individual's date of separation is not sufficient to complete collection

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
An Air Force member who owes debts to the government does not have to give his or her consent for the Air Force to collect. The Air Force may collect members' debts involving: (12.12.)
A. erroneous payments mad

D. all of these answers

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Military members may request relief from valid debts by applying for waiver or remission of the debt. The ________ has specific guidance and can provide assistance regarding these programs. (12.12.)
A. military

B. local financial services office

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
When a member receives erroneous pay or allowances, he or she may apply for a waiver of claims by the United States. Which agency is the approval authority for all waivers? (12.12.)
A. military personnel sectio

C. Defense Finance and Accounting Service

Chapter 12, Finance, Manpower, and Resources
Military members may request relief from valid debts by applying for waiver or remission of the debt. The Air Force may consider any indebtedness for remission except: (12.12.)
A. loss or damage to government p

B. non-collection of court-martial forfeiture

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Organizational change is not automatic. It is the deliberate adoption of a new idea or behavior by an organization and the establishment of new norms. First, leaders must: (13.9.)
A. explain the limitations of the pre

A. explain the limitations of the present process and the benefits of the change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Five of the most common responses to organizational change are Distrust, Uncertainty, Self-interest, Different Perceptions/No Felt Need to Change, and Over-determination. Distrust is: (13.9.)
A. the outward support bu

C. employee doubts about the purpose and intent of the change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Five of the most common responses to organizational change are Distrust, Uncertainty, Self-interest, Different Perceptions/No Felt Need to Change, and Over-determination. Uncertainty is: (13.9.)
A. the outward support

D. a fear of the unknown or seeing the change as a threat to their security

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Five of the most common responses to organizational change are Distrust, Uncertainty, Self-interest, Different Perceptions/No Felt Need to Change, and Over-determination. Self-interest is: (13.9.)
A. the outward suppo

C. a concern for their position and role in the existing environment

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Five of the most common responses to organizational change are Distrust, Uncertainty, Self-interest, Different Perceptions/No Felt Need to Change, and Over-determination. Different Perceptions/No Felt Need to Change i

B. the apparent outward support but internal resistance to change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Five of the most common responses to organizational change are Distrust, Uncertainty, Self-interest, Different Perceptions/No Felt Need to Change, and Over-determination. Over-determination is: (13.9.)
A. the outward

B. when the structure of an organization is a barrier to change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
There are several approaches leaders can take to implement organizational change: Education and Communication, Participation and Involvement, Facilitation and Support, Negotiation and Agreement, and Coercion. The meth

C. educating people about the need for and the expected benefits of a change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
There are several approaches leaders can take to implement organizational change: Education and Communication, Participation and Involvement, Facilitation and Support, Negotiation and Agreement, and Coercion. The meth

B. involving those affected by the change in its design and implementation

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
There are several approaches leaders can take to implement organizational change: Education and Communication, Participation and Involvement, Facilitation and Support, Negotiation and Agreement, and Coercion. The meth

D. introducing the change gradually and providing additional training if needed

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
There are several approaches leaders can take to implement organizational change: Education and Communication, Participation and Involvement, Facilitation and Support, Negotiation and Agreement, and Coercion. The meth

A. offering incentives to those who continue to resist the change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
There are several approaches leaders can take to implement organizational change: Education and Communication, Participation and Involvement, Facilitation and Support, Negotiation and Agreement, and Coercion. The meth

A. the use of force to get people to accept change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
There are several approaches leaders can take to implement organizational change: Education and Communication, Participation and Involvement, Facilitation and Support, Negotiation and Agreement, and Coercion. Which me

A. Coercion

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Mr Kurt Lewin, a social psychologist, recommended that leaders view change as a three-stage process: (13.11.)
A. unfreezing, changing, and refreezing
B. notification, response, and protection
C. perception, integratio

A. unfreezing, changing, and refreezing

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Kurt Lewin, a social psychologist, viewed change as a three-stage process: unfreezing, changing, and refreezing. Which stage is a deliberate management activity to prepare people for change? (13.11.)
A. changing
B. un

B. unfreezing

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Unfreezing is a deliberate management activity to prepare people for change. The most neglected, yet essential part of unfreezing is: (13.11.)
A. making people feel the need for change
B. locking in the desired outcom

A. making people feel the need for change

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Kurt Lewin, a social psychologist, viewed any change effort as a three-stage process: unfreezing, changing, and refreezing. The second stage, changing, is: (13.11.)
A. making people feel the need for change
B. locking

C. modifying technology, tasks, structure, or distribution of people

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Kurt Lewin, a social psychologist, viewed any change effort as a three-stage process: unfreezing, changing, and refreezing. The third stage, refreezing, is: (13.11.)
A. making people feel the need for change
B. lockin

B. locking in the desired outcomes and new norms

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Change is defined as a three-stage process: unfreezing, changing, and refreezing. Refreezing is necessary because without refreezing: (13.11.)
A. managers would be unable to overcome resistance
B. people often return

B. people often return to the old way of doing things

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Continuous Process Improvement is a comprehensive philosophy of operations based on the concept that: (13.12.)
A. processes can always be improved
B. there will always be an element of risk
C. conflict is inevitable i

A. processes can always be improved

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Definition: a comprehensive philosophy of operations built around the concept that there are always ways a process can be improved to better meet mission/customer requirements. (13.12.)
A. Supply Discipline
B. Air For

C. Continuous Process Improvement

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Although Continuous Process Improvement is important for operational efficiency, it is also important that our processes align with: (13.12.)
A. career goals
B. deployment cycles
C. strategic objectives
D. performance

C. strategic objectives

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Four major Continuous Process Improvement methodologies are: Lean, Six Sigma, Business Process Reengineering, and Theory of Constraints. Lean is: (13.12.)
A. a process that identifies unnecessary activities and elimin

B. focused on work flow, customer value, and eliminating non-value added activities

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Four major Continuous Process Improvement methodologies are: Lean, Six Sigma, Business Process Reengineering, and Theory of Constraints. Six Sigma is: (13.12.)
A. a process that identifies unnecessary activities and e

C. data-driven methodology focused on minimizing waste through reducing process variation

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Four major Continuous Process Improvement methodologies are: Lean, Six Sigma, Business Process Reengineering, and Theory of Constraints. Business Process Reengineering is: (13.12.)
A. a process that identifies unneces

A. a process that identifies unnecessary activities and eliminates them

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Four major Continuous Process Improvement methodologies are: Lean, Six Sigma, Business Process Reengineering, and Theory of Constraints. Theory of Constraints is: (13.12.)
A. a process that identifies unnecessary acti

D. optimizing resource utilization by identifying constraints (bottlenecks) in the process

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The core of the Air Force Continuous Process Improvement effort is: (13.13.)
A. the Three-Stage Change Process
B. the 5-Step Risk Management Process
C. the Practical Problem Solving Method
D. the Plan Do Check Act fou

C. the Practical Problem Solving Method

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The Practical Problem Solving Method is an eight-step process used to clarify problems, identify root causes, and develop appropriate countermeasures to achieve change. The first step to effective problem solving is t

C. clearly understand the problem

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The first step in the Practical Problem Solving Method process is: (13.13.)
A. Determine Root Cause
B. Set Improvement Targets
C. Clarify and Validate the Problem
D. Break Down Problem and Identify Performance Gaps

C. Clarify and Validate the Problem

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The first step in the Practical Problem Solving Method process is Clarify and Validate the Problem. This means to clearly understand the problem which is often best accomplished by developing a: (13.13.)
A. problem st

A. problem statement

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The second step in the Practical Problem Solving Method process is: (13.13.)
A. Determine Root Cause
B. Set Improvement Targets
C. Clarify and Validate the Problem
D. Break Down Problem and Identify Performance Gaps

D. Break Down Problem and Identify Performance Gaps

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The second step in the Practical Problem Solving Method process is Break Down Problem and Identify Performance Gaps. Performance gaps are the difference between: (13.13.)
A. countermeasures and results
B. expected out

C. the current state and the end state (expected outcome)

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In the third step of the Practical Problem Solving Method, process owners will set improvement targets. Improvement targets should be based on: (13.13.)
A. performance gaps
B. the current state
C. expected outcomes an

C. expected outcomes and strategic goals and objectives

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In the third step of the Practical Problem Solving Method, process owners will set improvement targets. Improvement targets should: (13.13.)
A. be undefined and vague
B. be challenging but achievable
C. not be aligned

B. be challenging but achievable

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Step 4 of the Practical Problem Solving Method is Determine Root Cause. This step is necessary because: (13.13.)
A. the commander will require a Report of Survey
B. organizations often deny responsibility for problems

D. problem-solving efforts are often directed at symptoms rather than root causes

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Step 4 of the Practical Problem Solving Method is Determine Root Cause. Step 5 of the Practical Problem Solving Method is: (13.13.)
A. Develop Countermeasures
B. Standardize Successful Processes
C. Confirm Results and

A. Develop Countermeasures

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Step 5 of the Practical Problem Solving Method is Develop Countermeasures. The key fact to remember is that the impact of a solution is a combination of the quality of the solution and: (13.13.)
A. the number of peopl

D. the acceptance of the solution by the people who implement it

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Step 6 of the Practical Problem Solving Method is See Countermeasures Through. In this step, the emphasis is on: (13.13.)
A. locking in expected outcomes
B. recognizing the need for change
C. tracking implementation,

C. tracking implementation, reviews, and progress checks

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Step 7 of the Practical Problem Solving Method is Confirm Results and Process. The processes should be monitored for performance relative to: (13.13.)
A. the baseline developed in Steps 1 and 2
B. targets established

D. all of these answers

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Step 7 of the Practical Problem Solving Method is Confirm Results and Process. The most common mistake made during continuous process improvement efforts is: (13.13.)
A. incorrect root causes determination
B. failing

A. incorrect root causes determination

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Of the eight steps of the Practical Problem Solving Method, which step is the most commonly neglected? (13.13.)
A. Step 4, Determine Root Cause
B. Step 7, Confirm Results and Process
C. Step 1, Clarify and Validate th

D. Step 8, Standardize Successful Processes

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The Practical Problem Solving Method is an excellent tool for making data-driven decisions. Three different levels of effort are available for accomplishing this method initiative: (13.14.)
A. tactical, operational, a

D. Just Do It, Rapid Improvement Event, and Improvement Project

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Three different levels of effort are available for accomplishing the Practical Problem Solving Method: Just Do It (or point improvement), Rapid Improvement Event, and Improvement Project. Which of these involves one p

A. Just Do It

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Different levels of effort are required to accomplish the Practical Problem Solving Method: Just Do It (or point improvement), Rapid Improvement Event, and Improvement Project. Which of these consists of a small team

B. Rapid Improvement Event

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Different levels of effort are required to accomplish the Practical Problem Solving Method: Just Do It (or point improvement), Rapid Improvement Event, and Improvement Project. Which of these requires a large team and

B. Improvement Project

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Definition: the process of leading, coordinating, planning, and controlling a diverse and complex set of processes and people in the pursuit of achieving an established objective. (13.15.)
A. Resource Management
B. Pr

C. Project Management

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Projects and Programs are distinctly different entities. The difference is: (13.15.)
A. programs are ongoing while projects are temporary
B. programs are managed by contractors while officers oversee projects
C. proje

A. programs are ongoing while projects are temporary

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management uses a unique array of terminology to identify and communicate its principles and uses. Define the Project Objective means: (13.15.)
A. follow the plan
B. answer questions about the project
C. devel

D. identify the objective or improvement to be achieved

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management uses a unique array of terminology to identify and communicate its principles and uses. Develop Solution Options means: (13.15.)
A. follow the plan
B. answer questions about the project
C. develop a

C. develop and evaluate alternative solutions

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management uses a unique array of terminology to identify and communicate its principles and uses. Plan the Project means: (13.15.)
A. follow the plan
B. answer questions about the project
C. develop and evalu

B. answer questions about the project

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management uses a unique array of terminology to identify and communicate its principles and uses. Execute the Plan means: (13.15.)
A. follow the plan
B. answer questions about the project
C. develop and evalu

A. follow the plan

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management uses a unique array of terminology to identify and communicate its principles and uses. Monitor and Control Progress means: (13.15.)
A. following the plan
B. answering questions about the project
C.

C. being present and making appropriate decisions

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management uses a unique array of terminology to identify and communicate its principles and uses. Close the Project means: (13.15.)
A. answer questions about the project
B. document and discuss lessons learne

B. document and discuss lessons learned

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In Project Management, these are the main constraints: (13.16.)
A. quality, time, and cost
B. ability, coordination, and vision
C. personnel, funding, and opportunity
D. location, obligations, and the organization

A. quality, time, and cost

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The main constraints in Project Management are quality, time, and cost. Quality refers to: (13.16.)
A. being in accordance with the specifications
B. the amount of time you have to complete the project
C. resource con

A. being in accordance with the specifications

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The main constraints in Project Management are quality, time, and cost. Time refers to: (13.16.)
A. being in accordance with the specifications
B. the amount of time you have to complete the project
C. resource constr

B. the amount of time you have to complete the project

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The main constraints in Project Management are quality, time, and cost. Cost refers to: (13.16.)
A. being in accordance with the specifications
B. the amount of time you have to complete the project
C. resource constr

C. resource constraints (money, manpower, machinery, and materials)

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Although the main constraints in Project Management are quality, time, and cost, normally one of them will be more important than the others. This constraint is known as the _______. (13.16.)
A. wedge
B. driver
C. obj

B. driver

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
What is the most important and time-consuming aspect of project management? (13.17.)
A. planning
B. execution
C. scheduling
D. closing the project

A. planning

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
What is the goal of project management? (13.17.)
A. to achieve the objective of the project in the most logical, sensible manner
B. to neutralize security threats in order to ensure unhindered Air Force operations
C.

A. to achieve the objective of the project in the most logical, sensible manner

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management objectives should have B-SMART characteristics. B-SMART is an acronym that stands for: (13.17.)
A. Broad Scalable Matter and Resource Table
B. B-Systemic Metric-driven Actions at the Right Time
C. B

C. Balanced, Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Time-bound

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management objectives should have B-SMART characteristics: Balanced, Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Time-bound. Balanced means: (13.17.)
A. goals are balanced across multiple fronts
B.

A. goals are balanced across multiple fronts

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management objectives should have B-SMART characteristics: Balanced, Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Time-bound. Specific means: (13.17.)
A. goals are balanced across multiple fronts
B.

B. the who, what, where, when, and why details

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management objectives should have B-SMART characteristics: Balanced, Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Time-bound. Measurable means: (13.17.)
A. goals are balanced across multiple fronts
B

D. having criteria for measuring progress toward each objective

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management objectives should have B-SMART characteristics: Balanced, Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Time-bound. Attainable means: (13.17.)
A. goals are balanced across multiple fronts
B

C. resources are available and objectives are possible

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management objectives should have B-SMART characteristics: Balanced, Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Time-bound. Results-focused means: (13.17.)
A. the who, what, where, when, and why de

B. objectives are linked to mission, vision, and goal

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Project management objectives should have B-SMART characteristics: Balanced, Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Time-bound. Time-bound means: (13.17.)
A. the who, what, where, when, and why details

D. having a targeted date for completion to provide accountability

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In project management, a work breakdown structure is a technique based on: (13.17.)
A. the Practical Problem Solving Method
B. hiring from outside the organization
C. assigning tasks to work center members
D. dividing

D. dividing a project into sub-units or work packages

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Which step of project management provides the crucial information for determining how the tasks of the project interrelate? (13.17.)
A. Scheduling
B. Task Analysis
C. Execute the Plan
D. Define the Project Objective

B. Task Analysis

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
As leaders, we must develop effective teams to accomplish the mission. There are three attributes present in all healthy teams: (13.18.)
A. nondirective, directive, and combined
B. trust, communication, and cooperatio

B. trust, communication, and cooperation

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The three attributes present in all healthy teams are trust, communication, and cooperation. While each is essential in building a healthy team spirit, _______ is at the core of all healthy team interaction. (13.18.)

A. trust

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The three attributes present in all healthy teams are trust, communication, and cooperation. Trust is at the core of all healthy team interaction because: (13.18.)
A. teamwork requires good relationships with a high d

D. all of these answers

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The three attributes present in all healthy teams are trust, communication, and cooperation. Communication is: (13.18.)
A. when leaders hold on to information
B. withholding vital information or disengaging from the t

C. the honest, open sharing of information, ideas, and feelings

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
The three attributes present in all healthy teams are trust, communication, and cooperation. Cooperation is: (13.18.)
A. when competition exists among team members
B. withholding vital information or disengaging from

D. working together and depending on each other to achieve shared objectives

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Team members do not immediately form strong bonds of trust, communication, and cooperation. There are typically stages that teams move through before becoming functional, productive teams. The stages are: (13.19.)
A.

C. forming, storming, norming, and performing

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
All teams move through the stages of forming, storming, norming, and performing. The forming stage is when team members: (13.19.)
A. have settled relationships and expectations and begin performing and acting as a coh

D. explore the boundaries of acceptable group behavior and transition from individuals to team members

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
All teams move through the stages of forming, storming, norming, and performing. The storming stage is when team members: (13.19.)
A. have settled relationships and expectations and begin performing and acting as a co

B. realize the task is more difficult than expected and try to rely solely on their own experience

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
All teams move through the stages of forming, storming, norming, and performing. Probably the most difficult stage is: (13.19.)
A. forming
B. storming
C. norming
D. performing

B. storming

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
All teams move through the stages of forming, storming, norming, and performing. The norming stage is when team members: (13.19.)
A. have settled relationships and expectations and begin performing and acting as a coh

C. reconcile their differences and begin to cooperate and are able to spend more time on the project

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
All teams move through the stages of forming, storming, norming, and performing. The performing stage is when team members: (13.19.)
A. have settled relationships and expectations and begin performing and acting as a

A. have settled relationships and expectations and begin performing and acting as a cohesive unit

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Conflict is ________ in every organization and is often necessary to reach high levels of performance. (13.20.)
fA. mandatory
B. inevitable
C. never appropriate
D. always followed by failure

B. inevitable

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Definition: differences between parties that result in interference or opposition. (13.20.)
A. stress
B. conflict
C. competition
D. contamination

B. conflict

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Conflict can cause positive change or decrease productivity. Therefore, conflict is: (13.20.)
A. constructive and destructive
B. always constructive and productive
C. always destructive and unproductive
D. incompatibl

A. constructive and destructive

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Conflict can be constructive or destructive. Conflict is destructive when: (13.20.)
A. it degrades morale
B. it presents barriers to cooperation
C. it diverts attention from important tasks
D. all of these answers

D. all of these answers

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Conflict can be constructive or destructive. Conflict is constructive when it: (13.20.)
A. degrades morale
B. presents barriers to cooperation
C. diverts attention from important tasks
D. leads to solutions, greater u

D. leads to solutions, greater understanding, and enhanced communication

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
At times, managers tend to avoid conflict because of its negative repercussions; however, managing conflict effectively benefits the organization by: (13.20.)
A. reducing ambiguity and stimulating productivity
B. limi

A. reducing ambiguity and stimulating productivity

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
To manage conflict successfully, it helps to understand the sources of conflict. Conflict often originates with one or more of the following situations: (13.21.)
A. misunderstandings, rivalry, and an antiquated milita

B. communication factors, structural factors, and personal behavior factors

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Conflict originates with one or more of the following situations: communication factors, structural factors, and personal behavior factors. Communication factors means: (13.21.)
A. the size of the organization and the

D. miscommunication; when communication is misinterpreted, inaccurate, or incomplete

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Conflict originates with one or more of the following situations: communication factors, structural factors, and personal behavior factors. Structural factors include: (13.21.)
A. the size of the organization and the

A. the size of the organization and the amount of interaction

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Conflict originates with one or more of the following situations: communication factors, structural factors, and personal behavior factors. Personal behavior factors include: (13.21.)
A. the size of the organization a

C. individual differences such as perceptions, values, and personalities

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Leaders can determine how to categorize workplace conflict and how to best manage it based on: (13.22.)
A. a combination of ego states
B. task and relationship behavior
C. the Airman's problem solving skills
D. the de

D. the degree of cooperation and assertiveness

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Leaders can determine how to categorize workplace conflict and how to best manage it based on the degree of cooperation and assertiveness of those involved. Cooperation refers to: (13.22.)
A. the relative priority of

C. how willing or unwilling a person is to satisfy the other's need

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Leaders can determine how to categorize workplace conflict and how to best manage it based on the degree of cooperation and assertiveness of those involved. Assertiveness refers to: (13.22.)
A. satisfying the concerns

C. how passive or active a person is in addressing the conflict

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
According to Dr. Kenneth Thomas, there are five major conflict management styles: (13.22.)
A. forming, storming, norming, and performing
B. empowering, supportive, corrective, authoritative, and coercion
C. competing

C. competing (forcing), collaborating, accommodating, avoiding, and compromising

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Dr. Thomas states that there are five major conflict management styles: competing (forcing), collaborating, accommodating, avoiding, and compromising. Competing or forcing is: (13.22.)
A. holding a neutral position
B.

D. overwhelming an opponent with formal authority, threats, or power

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
One of the five styles of conflict management is Competing (forcing). Which levels of cooperation and assertiveness make this style appropriate? (13.22.)
A. high assertiveness and low cooperativeness
B. low assertiven

A. high assertiveness and low cooperativeness

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Dr. Thomas states that there are five major conflict management styles managers can use to deal with conflict: competing (forcing), collaborating, accommodating, avoiding, and compromising. Collaborating is: (13.22.)

C. satisfying the concerns of both sides through discussion

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
One of the five styles of conflict management is Collaborating. Which levels of cooperation and assertiveness make this style appropriate? (13.22.)
A. high assertiveness and low cooperativeness
B. low assertiveness an

C. high assertiveness and high cooperativeness

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Dr. Thomas stated that there are five major conflict management styles: competing (forcing), collaborating, accommodating, avoiding, and compromising. Accommodating is: (13.22.)
A. holding a neutral position
B. giving

B. giving in to another person's wishes

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
One of the five styles of conflict management is Accommodating. Which levels of cooperation and assertiveness characterize this style? (13.22.)
A. high assertiveness and low cooperativeness
B. low assertiveness and lo

D. low assertiveness and high cooperativeness

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Dr. Thomas stated that there are five major conflict management styles: competing (forcing), collaborating, accommodating, avoiding, and compromising. Avoiding is: (13.22.)
A. holding a neutral position
B. giving in t

A. holding a neutral position

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
One of the five styles of conflict management is Avoiding. Which levels of cooperation and assertiveness characterize this style? (13.22.)
A. high assertiveness and low cooperativeness
B. low assertiveness and low coo

B. low assertiveness and low cooperativeness

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Dr. Thomas listed five major conflict management styles: competing (forcing), collaborating, accommodating, avoiding, and compromising. Compromising is: (13.22.)
A. holding a neutral position
B. giving in to another p

C. the partial satisfaction of both parties' desires

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
One of the five styles of conflict management is Compromising. Which levels of cooperation and assertiveness characterize this style? (13.22.)
A. high assertiveness and low cooperativeness
B. low assertiveness and low

D. some assertiveness and some cooperativeness

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
When considering each of the conflict management styles, what should leaders consider in order to determine the best approach to resolve the conflict? (13.22.)
A. the who
B. the stakes
C. the situation
D. all of these

D. all of these answers

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
This is a theory of personality as well as an application for personal growth and personal change. Its principles and techniques are used by managers to better understand themselves and their relationships with others

B. Transactional Analysis

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis is a theory of personality as well as an application for personal growth and personal change. It can be defined by several principles, such as: (13.23.)
A. Values, Perception, and Personality
B.

B. Ego States, Life Positions, Transactions, and Strokes

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis (TA) can be defined by several principles such as Ego States, Life Positions, Transactions, and Strokes. These principles can be used to form techniques to: (13.23.)
A. identify Fraud, Waste, an

D. improve individual productivity and increase organizational effectiveness

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis (TA) can be defined by several principles such as Ego States, Life Positions, Transactions, and Strokes. Ego States are: (13.23.)
A. interactions among two or more people
B. a form of recognitio

D. our past influences, referred to as Parent, Adult, and Child

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis states that everyone is a product of their past experiences and categorizes these influences as Parent, Adult, and Child ego states. The Parent ego state is: (13.23.)
A. our recordings of our pe

A. our recordings of our perceptions of our parents' actions

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis states that everyone is a product of their past experiences and categorizes these influences as Parent, Adult, and Child ego states. The Adult ego state is: (13.23.)
A. our recordings of our per

B. an objective way of acting that deals with the real world

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis states that everyone is a product of their past experiences and categorizes these influences as Parent, Adult, and Child ego states. The Child ego state is: (13.23.)
A. our recordings of our per

C. our recordings of the feelings and reactions of our childhood

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis (TA) can be defined by several principles such as Ego States, Life Positions, Transactions, and Strokes. Life Positions refers to: (13.23.)
A. interactions among two or more people
B. a form of

C. how a person feels about oneself and about other people

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
Transactional Analysis (TA) can be defined by several principles such as Ego States, Life Positions, Transactions, and Strokes. Transactions are: (13.23.)
A. interactions among two or more people
B. a form of recognit

A. interactions among two or more people

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In the theory of Transactional Analysis, transactions are interactions among two or more people. An initial interaction among two or more people is: (13.23.)
A. a crossed transaction
B. a transactional stimulus
C. a t

B. a transactional stimulus

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In the theory of Transactional Analysis, transactions are interactions among two or more people. A reaction by an individual to another individual's transactional stimulus is: (13.23.)
A. a crossed transaction
B. a tr

C. a transactional response

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In Transactional Analysis, transactions are interactions among two or more people. During a transaction, when the responses from both parties are appropriate and expected, it is classified as: (13.23.)
A. exclusion
B.

D. parallel or complementary

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In Transactional Analysis, transactions are interactions among two or more people. During a transaction, when the response from either party is not appropriate or expected, it is classified as: (13.23.)
A. exclusion
B

C. a crossed transaction

Chapter 13, Organizational Management
In Transactional Analysis, transactions are interactions among two or more people. During a transaction, when the response includes a certain tone, verbiage, or sarcasm that make the interaction less recognizable, it

B. an ulterior response

Chapter 14, Leadership
The act of leading in the Air Force is the art and science of accomplishing the Air Force mission by motivating, influencing, and directing Airmen. This definition highlights two central elements of leadership: (14.1.)
A. (1) art an

D. (1) the mission, objective, or task and (2) the Airmen who accomplish it

Chapter 14, Leadership
The act of leading in the Air Force is the art and science of accomplishing the Air Force mission by motivating, influencing, and directing Airmen. The art of leadership refers to: (14.1.)
A. driving people in the right direction
B.

C. the demonstration and application of leading

Chapter 14, Leadership
The act of leading in the Air Force is the art and science of accomplishing the Air Force mission by motivating, influencing, and directing Airmen. The science of leadership refers to: (14.1.)
A. driving people in the right directio

D. the methods and understanding of what leadership is

Chapter 14, Leadership
While leadership and management are separate topics, they go hand in hand in producing mission success. In order to be successful, organizations: (14.2.)
A. must choose one or the other
B. need a strong balance of both
C. should foc

B. need a strong balance of both

Chapter 14, Leadership
A leader is a person who leads or commands a group, organization, or country. Terms often associated with leadership roles include: (14.2.)
A. career field managers
B. major command functional managers
C. program managers and projec

D. flight leader, team leader, and squad leader

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership and management are not the same thing. Managers administer, maintain, and control while leaders: (14.2.)
A. analyze, isolate, and order
B. plan, organize, and execute
C. measure, implement, and review
D. motivate, develop

D. motivate, develop, and inspire

Chapter 14, Leadership
The difference between management and leadership behavior is that managers control people by pushing them in the right direction while leaders: (14.2.)
A. monitor metrics and measure progress
B. communicate plans and delegate respon

C. motivate and inspire people to act by satisfying human needs

Chapter 14, Leadership
A manager is a person responsible for controlling or administering all or part of a company or organization. Terms often associated with managerial roles include: (14.2.)
A. career field managers
B. major command functional managers

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership and management are not the same thing. Leaders motivate, develop, and inspire while managers: (14.2.)
A. persuade and empower
B. stimulate, excite, and encourage
C. influence, support, and energize
D. administrate, mainta

D. administrate, maintain, and control

Chapter 14, Leadership
The difference between management and leadership behavior is that leaders motivate and inspire people to interact and understand one another as they move in the right direction by satisfying human needs while managers: (14.2.)
A. di

D. focus on tasks and drive people in the right direction

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership and management are not the same thing. Generally, managers ensure the resources needed are readily available and efficiently used while leaders: (14.2.)
A. organize projects
B. staff positions with qualified individuals
C

D. launch and steer the organization toward goals and strategies

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership and management are not the same thing. Managers organize projects, staff positions with qualified individuals, communicate plans, delegate responsibilities, and devise systems to monitor implementation. Leaders support th

C. aligning personnel's needs, wants, and aspirations with the task

Chapter 14, Leadership
What did General Fogleman create in 1996 to develop a common frame of reference among Air Force members? (14.4.)
A. the enlisted force structure
B. the CSAF Professional Reading Program
C. equal per diem for enlisted and officers
D.

B. the CSAF Professional Reading Program

Chapter 14, Leadership
Mentoring is a process designed to help each individual: (14.5.)
A. round out their EPR
B. earn a promotion endorsement
C. conform to Air Force standards
D. reach his or her maximum potential

D. reach his or her maximum potential

Chapter 14, Leadership
Mentoring is an inherent obligation and responsibility of _______. (14.5.)
A. trainees
B. Air Force leaders
C. work center members
D. unit training managers

B. Air Force leaders

Chapter 14, Leadership
Through mentoring, senior leaders pass on their experience and wisdom to junior members as well as: (14.5.)
A. their philosophy
B. traditions and shared values
C. quality and lessons learned
D. all of these answers

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
This is an ongoing process and perhaps the most powerful method leadership can use to shape the future and help prepare Airmen for increased responsibilities. (14.5.)
A. mentoring
B. sponsorship
C. PME school attendance
D. the enlis

A. mentoring

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Air Force mentoring program covers a wide range of areas, such as career guidance, professional development, and leadership. But foremost, individuals must focus on: (14.6.)
A. civilian education
B. his or her own interests
C. A

C. Air Force institutional needs

Chapter 14, Leadership
Mentors must distinguish between individual goals, career aspirations, and realistic expectations. There are numerous paths to meet individual goals but the individual's primary focus should be on: (14.6.)
A. civilian education
B. h

C. Air Force institutional needs

Chapter 14, Leadership
The primary mentor, coach, counselor, guide, or role model for Airmen is: (14.6.)
A. his or her NCOIC
B. the First sergeant
C. the unit commander
D. the immediate supervisor or rater

D. the immediate supervisor or rater

Chapter 14, Leadership
Which AFI governs Air Force mentoring? (14.6.)
A. AFI 36-2905, Fitness Program
B. AFI 36-3003, Military Leave Program
C. AFMAN 36-2643, Air Force Mentoring Program
D. AFI 36-2903, Dress and Personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel

C. AFMAN 36-2643, Air Force Mentoring Program

Chapter 14, Leadership
The mnemonic device developed from the word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G, helps us remember its concepts. Its letters stand for: (14.7.)
A. Maintain, Educate, Navigate, Test, Observe, React, Involve, Nourish, Grade
B. Measure, Educate, Nouris

D. Model, Empathize, Nurture, Teach, Organize, Respond, Inspire, Network, Goal-set

Chapter 14, Leadership
The mnemonic device developed from the word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G, helps us remember its concepts. The letter, M, stands for: (14.7.)
A. Model; an effective mentor must lead by example
B. Measure; a metric to determine progress must be

A. Model; an effective mentor must lead by example

Chapter 14, Leadership
The mnemonic device developed from the word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G, helps us remember its concepts. The letter, E, stands for Empathize and means to: (14.7.)
A. focus on the topics where the need is greatest
B. insulate the protege from

D. show compassion and remember what it was like to be inexperienced

Chapter 14, Leadership
The mnemonic device developed from the word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G, helps us remember its concepts. The first letter N stands for: (14.7.)
A. Network; use the protege's contacts to obtain qualified workers
B. Nurture; a caring attitude

B. Nurture; a caring attitude and investing ample time, patience, and effort

Chapter 14, Leadership
The mnemonic device developed from the word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G, helps us remember its concepts. The letter, T, stands for: (14.7.)
A. Test
B. Trust
C. Teach
D. Tolerate

C. Teach

Chapter 14, Leadership
In addition to being a word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G is a mnemonic device. Which of the letters represents (1) organizing the material into logical units, (2) correcting errors, (3) frequently reviewing previously covered material, (4) in

A. T (for Teach)

Chapter 14, Leadership
In addition to being a word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G is a mnemonic device. The letter, O, represents Organize and means: (14.7.)
A. a caring attitude and investing ample time, patience, and effort
B. to show compassion and remember what i

C. having a logical, sequential plan aimed at a precisely defined target

Chapter 14, Leadership
In addition to being a word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G is a mnemonic device. The letter, R, represents Respond and means: (14.7.)
A. a caring attitude and investing ample time, patience, and effort
B. to show compassion and remember what it

D. to anticipate and listen to questions and provide useful and timely responses

Chapter 14, Leadership
In addition to being a word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G is a mnemonic device. What does the letter, I, represent? (14.7.)
A. Inform
B. Involve
C. Inspire
D. Illustrate

C. Inspire

Chapter 14, Leadership
In addition to being a word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G is a mnemonic device. The letter, I, represents Inspire and means: (14.7.)
A. to encourage a protege to transform into an improved being
B. a caring attitude and investing ample time, p

A. to encourage a protege to transform into an improved being

Chapter 14, Leadership
In addition to being a word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G is a mnemonic device. What does the second letter 'N' represent? (14.7.)
A. Network; using the protege's contacts to obtain qualified workers
B. Nurture; a caring attitude and investing

D. Network; introducing the protege to other people who can also provide guidance

Chapter 14, Leadership
In addition to being a word, M-E-N-T-O-R-I-N-G is a mnemonic device. What does the letter, G, represent? (14.7.)
A. Grade; measuring the protege's progress
B. Goal-set; teaching the importance of setting goals
C. Graduate; determini

B. Goal-set; teaching the importance of setting goals

Chapter 14, Leadership
The key to successful counseling is to: (14.9.)
A. involve external agencies such as legal services
B. refer Airmen before a situation becomes a problem
C. limit counseling to only during ACA feedback sessions
D. conduct the counsel

D. conduct the counseling as close to the event as possible

Chapter 14, Leadership
The key to successful counseling is to conduct the counseling as close to the event as possible. When should crisis counseling be conducted? (14.9.)
A. typically but not only during ACA feedback sessions
B. when necessary to help Ai

D. after Airmen receive negative news to help them through the shock

Chapter 14, Leadership
The key to successful counseling is to conduct the counseling as close to the event as possible. When should referral counseling be conducted? (14.9.)
A. typically but not only during ACA feedback sessions
B. when necessary to help

B. when necessary to help Airmen work through a personal situation

Chapter 14, Leadership
The key to successful counseling is to conduct the counseling as close to the event as possible. When should professional growth counseling be conducted? (14.9.)
A. typically but not only during ACA feedback sessions
B. when necessa

A. typically but not only during ACA feedback sessions

Chapter 14, Leadership
The key to successful counseling is to conduct the counseling as close to the event as possible. When should counseling for superior or substandard duty performance be conducted? (14.9.)
A. typically but not only during ACA feedback

C. as close to the superior or substandard performance as possible

Chapter 14, Leadership
Different people and different situations require different counseling approaches. Three approaches to counseling include: (14.10.)
A. individual, unit, and Air Force
B. nondirective, directive, and combined
C. voluntary, involuntar

B. nondirective, directive, and combined

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. The major difference between these approaches to counseling is: (14.10.)
A. the degree to which the Airman participates
B. the level of authority held by

A. the degree to which the Airman participates

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. Which approach is preferred for most counseling sessions and avoids providing solutions or rendering opinions? (14.10.)
A. nondirective
B. directive
C. co

A. nondirective

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. Which approach is preferred when time is short, when the solution is clear, or if an Airman has limited problem-solving skills and needs guidance? (14.10.

B. directive

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. The directive approach: (14.10.)
A. is when the counselor directs a course of action for the Airman
B. works best to make on-the-spot corrections and corr

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. The combined approach: (14.10.)
A. is appropriate when an Airman has limited problem-solving skills
B. uses techniques from both the directive and nondire

B. uses techniques from both the directive and nondirective approaches

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. The disadvantage of the nondirective approach is: (fig 14.2.)
A. it discourages Airmen from talking freely
B. it may treat the symptoms but not the proble

D. it's more time consuming and requires greater counselor skills

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. The advantage of the nondirective approach is: (fig 14.2.)
A. it's the quickest method
B. it allows counselors to use their own experience
C. it encourage

C. it encourages open communication and develops responsibility

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. The disadvantage of the directive approach is: (fig 14.2.)
A. it discourages Airmen from talking freely
B. it may treat the symptoms but not the problem
C

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three approaches to counseling include nondirective, directive, and combined. The advantage of the directive approach is: (fig 14.2.)
A. it encourages maturity
B. it's the quickest method
C. it develops responsibility
D. it encourag

B. it's the quickest method

Chapter 14, Leadership
One of the most important things a leader can do when conducting a counseling session, regardless of purpose, is to: (14.11.)
A. conduct the session after duty hours
B. document the proceedings to protect both parties
C. ensure the

C. ensure the intent is established and the environment is appropriate

Chapter 14, Leadership
Although the length of time required for a counseling session will vary, a counseling session should last: (14.11.)
A. less than one hour
B. less than 30 minutes
C. no longer than the end of the duty day
D. as long as necessary to e

A. less than one hour

Chapter 14, Leadership
The environment chosen for a counseling session should have minimal interruptions and be free from distractions in order to: (14.11.)
A. discourage Airmen from talking freely
B. allow counselors to use their own experience
C. show r

C. show respect for the Airman and the conversation

Chapter 14, Leadership
Even when not prepared for formal counseling, you can follow the four basic components of a counseling session to ensure success. The four components of the counseling session are: (14.11.)
A. observe, analyze, conduct, and document

D. state the purpose, discuss the issues, develop a plan of action, and record the plan

Chapter 14, Leadership
The counseling process does not end with the counseling session. Appropriate measures after counseling include: (14.11.)
A. taking corrective measures
B. informing the chain of command
C. follow-up counseling and making referrals
D.

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leaders coach Airmen the same way athletic coaches improve their teams: (14.12.)
A. by identifying strengths and weaknesses
B. by providing oversight and motivation throughout the process
C. by setting goals and developing and imple

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
Two types of feedback are supportive feedback (reinforcing an ongoing behavior) and corrective feedback (desiring a change in behavior). Supportive Feedback is used to: (14.13.)
A. welcome a new arrival to the workcenter
B. identify

C. reinforce behavior that is effective and desirable

Chapter 14, Leadership
Supportive feedback is used to reinforce behavior that is effective and desirable. What is reinforced has a tendency to become stronger, while what is not reinforced has a tendency to: (14.13.)
A. fade away
B. become a habit
C. grad

A. fade away

Chapter 14, Leadership
Which of the following is a suggested strategy for supportive feedback? (14.13.)
A. develop a plan to rectify the situation
B. ask what happened; the subordinate may not be totally at fault
C. help the subordinate to take full respo

D. let the individual know that you are pleased about something he or she did

Chapter 14, Leadership
Two types of feedback are supportive feedback (reinforcing an ongoing behavior) and corrective feedback (desiring a change in behavior). Corrective Feedback is used to: (14.13.)
A. welcome a new arrival to the workcenter
B. pass alo

D. alter a behavior that is ineffective or inappropriate

Chapter 14, Leadership
A corrective feedback session is not a positive experience. In order to help the individual recover in the shortest possible time, the supervisor should: (14.13.)
A. present an immediate alternative or option
B. call in the other me

A. present an immediate alternative or option

Chapter 14, Leadership
Which of the following is a suggested strategy for corrective feedback? (14.13.)
A. thank the subordinate for the good performance
B. acknowledge the specific action to be reinforced
C. explain the effects of the accomplishment and

D. describe the event and its effects in specific, observable, and behavioral terms

Chapter 14, Leadership
After an issue is resolved, end the feedback session by stating your confidence in the ability of the individual to handle the situation. The purpose of this is to: (14.13.)
A. allow the giver to change tactics or strategy as needed

C. help the individual to feel as optimistic as possible about the situation

Chapter 14, Leadership
An important rule in giving feedback, whether it's supportive or corrective, is to: (14.13.)
A. have at least one witness present
B. describe the behavior in specific terms
C. personalize the issue and focus on attitudes and feeling

B. describe the behavior in specific terms

Chapter 14, Leadership
If an employee is to learn from feedback and respond to it, they must be able to clearly see: (14.13.)
A. that their attitude needs improvement
B. what punishment will be faced if behavior doesn't change
C. how the behavior affected

C. how the behavior affected the group's performance, morale, etc

Chapter 14, Leadership
Just as feedback must be specific to be effective, it must also focus on actions and not attitudes so that: (14.13.)
A. Airmen are held accountable for their attitudes
B. the individual can recover as quickly as possible
C. the indi

D. the issue will be depersonalized and individuals will be more receptive

Chapter 14, Leadership
When providing feedback, an important consideration is when it is given. Feedback works best if given: (14.13.)
A. only during ACA feedback sessions
B. as soon as possible after the behavior occurs
C. no earlier than one week after

B. as soon as possible after the behavior occurs

Chapter 14, Leadership
Feedback works best if it is given as soon as possible after the behavior occurs because: (14.13.)
A. the passage of time may make the behavior seem less important
B. waiting decreases the impact the feedback will have on the behavi

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
The person giving the feedback is responsible for relating the situation as he or she observes it, and the person receiving the feedback is responsible for: (14.13.)
A. recovering as quickly as possible
B. relating what he or she me

B. relating what he or she meant, felt, or thought

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leaders must effectively influence others. Three qualities that help leaders gain respect and credibility and have a positive influence on others are: (14.14.)
A. transparency, predictability, and equitability
B. self-awareness, cul

B. self-awareness, cultural awareness, and empathy

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three qualities that help leaders gain respect and credibility and have a positive influence on others are self-awareness, cultural awareness, and empathy. Self-awareness is: (14.14.)
A. leaders being aware of their own values, need

A. leaders being aware of their own values, needs, and biases

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three qualities that help leaders gain respect and credibility and have a positive influence on others are self-awareness, cultural awareness, and empathy. Cultural awareness is: (14.14.)
A. leaders being aware of their own values,

B. knowing how cultural backgrounds may influence values or perspectives

Chapter 14, Leadership
Three qualities that help leaders gain respect and credibility and have a positive influence on others are self-awareness, cultural awareness, and empathy. Empathy is: (14.14.)
A. leaders being aware of their own values, needs, and

C. being understanding of and sensitive to another person's feelings

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leaders foster professional growth by: (14.16.)
A. setting the stage for some adventure
B. providing challenging and enlightening experiences
C. insisting Airmen focus on the aspects of a situation or project they control
D. all of

D. all of these answers

Chapter 14, Leadership
The role of the leader in fostering growth is: (14.16.)
A. dealing with emotions often associated with change
B. formally recognizing individual and unit successes
C. to identify and analyze knowledge and improvement opportunities
D

C. to identify and analyze knowledge and improvement opportunities

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leaders encourage the learning process by: (14.16.)
A. dealing with emotions often associated with change
B. formally recognizing individual and unit successes
C. identify and analyze knowledge and improvement opportunities
D. ident

B. formally recognizing individual and unit successes

Chapter 14, Leadership
Developing Airmen for leadership positions requires consistent exposure to challenges with gradual increases in responsibility over long periods of time. The first step is: (14.16.)
A. dealing with emotions often associated with cha

D. identifying people with leadership potential early in their careers

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leaders must diagnose the developmental needs of Airmen, then assist them with obtaining appropriate training. Professional development needs include: (14.16.)
A. challenging and enlightening experiences
B. off-duty education, PME,

B. off-duty education, PME, and specific skills training

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leaders must diagnose the developmental needs of Airmen, then assist them with obtaining appropriate training. Personal developmental needs include: (14.16.)
A. setting high, attainable standards
B. providing challenging and enlight

D. relationships, interpersonal skills, and off-duty education

Chapter 14, Leadership
To learn and improve, people need to be encouraged to try new things even if they fail. How do Airmen deal with setbacks? (14.16.)
A. by formally recognizing individual and unit successes
B. they identify and analyze knowledge and i

C. they count on the experience and understanding of strong leaders

Chapter 14, Leadership
What must leaders do before dealing with the change process? (14.16.)
A. learn as much as possible about a change
B. formally recognize individual and unit successes
C. deal with the emotions often associated with change
D. identify

A. learn as much as possible about a change

Chapter 14, Leadership
There are no secrets or magic formulas when it comes to being a successful leader. The best advice is: (14.17.)
A. "just be yourself"
B. emulate your supervisor
C. follow traditional military examples
D. focus on personality and per

A. "just be yourself

Chapter 14, Leadership
Everyone can learn to harness the individual power they already have to expand their capabilities in the workplace. By developing their own sources of power, leaders will: (14.18.)
A. increase communications but decrease efficiency

C. be less dependent on others and able to make greater contributions

Chapter 14, Leadership
The concept of power in the workplace has many positive aspects. We should develop an understanding that "the sole advantage of power is the ability to: (14.18.)
A. do more good"
B. communicate effectively"
C. facilitate cooperation

A. do more good

Chapter 14, Leadership
Within the workplace, there are many types of individual power: Position Power, Task Power, Personal Power, Relationship Power, and Knowledge Power. Position Power is: (14.18.)
A. being good at a particular task
B. the inherent auth

B. the inherent authority of your position

Chapter 14, Leadership
Within the workplace, there are many types of individual power: Position Power, Task Power, Personal Power, Relationship Power, and Knowledge Power. Task Power is: (14.18.)
A. being good at a particular task
B. the inherent authorit

A. being good at a particular task

Chapter 14, Leadership
Within the workplace, there are many types of individual power: Position Power, Task Power, Personal Power, Relationship Power, and Knowledge Power. Personal Power is: (14.18.)
A. being good at a particular task
B. the inherent auth

D. the strength of our character and communication skills

Chapter 14, Leadership
Within the workplace, there are many types of individual power: Position Power, Task Power, Personal Power, Relationship Power, and Knowledge Power. Relationship Power is: (14.18.)
A. being good at a particular task
B. the inherent

C. the advantage of relationships with others

Chapter 14, Leadership
Within the workplace, there are many types of individual power: Position Power, Task Power, Personal Power, Relationship Power, and Knowledge Power. Knowledge Power is: (14.18.)
A. being good at a particular task
B. the advantage of

C. having expertise or qualifications in a general area

Chapter 14, Leadership
Full Range Leadership Development (FRLD) requires leadership to be viewed as a system made up of three core elements: (14.19.)
A. perception, cooperation, and synergy
B. authority, subordinates, and the mission
C. the sender, the me

D. the leader, the follower, and the situation

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Full Range Leadership Development model includes five leadership behaviors: Laissez-Faire, Management by Exception (passive), Management by Exception (active), Contingent Rewards, and Transformational Leadership. Which is least

A. Laissez-Faire

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Full Range Leadership Development model includes five leadership behaviors: Laissez-Faire, Management by Exception (passive), Management by Exception (active), Contingent Rewards, and Transformational Leadership. Which is most e

C. Transformational Leadership

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Full Range Leadership Development model includes five leadership behaviors: Laissez-Faire, Management by Exception (passive), Management by Exception (active), Contingent Rewards, and Transformational Leadership. LaissezFaire be

D. viewing the development and needs of subordinates as someone else's concern

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Full Range Leadership Development model includes five leadership behaviors: Laissez-Faire, Management by Exception (passive), Management by Exception (active), Contingent Rewards, and Transformational Leadership. Management by E

A. the "if it's not broke, don't fix it" leadership style

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Full Range Leadership Development model includes five leadership behaviors: Laissez-Faire, Management by Exception (passive), Management by Exception (active), Contingent Rewards, and Transformational Leadership. Management by E

C. controlling processes and personnel with very active supervision

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Full Range Leadership Development model includes five leadership behaviors: Laissez-Faire, Management by Exception (passive), Management by Exception (active), Contingent Rewards, and Transformational Leadership. Contingent Rewa

D. providing a reward contingent on the follower performing to expectations

Chapter 14, Leadership
The Full Range Leadership Development model includes five leadership behaviors: Laissez-Faire, Management by Exception (passive), Management by Exception (active), Contingent Rewards, and Transformational Leadership. Transformationa

B. offering followers a vision and inspiring their mission

Chapter 14, Leadership
There are four components of Transformational Leadership: Individualized Consideration, Intellectual Stimulation, Inspirational Motivation, and Idealized Influence. Individualized Consideration means: (14.20.)
A. nurturing; treating

A. nurturing; treating followers as individuals

Chapter 14, Leadership
There are four components of Transformational Leadership: Individualized Consideration, Intellectual Stimulation, Inspirational Motivation, and Idealized Influence. Intellectual Stimulation means: (14.20.)
A. nurturing; treating fol

B. thinking; valuing subordinates' rationality and intellect

Chapter 14, Leadership
There are four components of Transformational Leadership: Individualized Consideration, Intellectual Stimulation, Inspirational Motivation, and Idealized Influence. Inspirational Motivation means: (14.20.)
A. nurturing; treating fol

D. charming; articulating visions that inspire followers to work harder

Chapter 14, Leadership
There are four components of Transformational Leadership: Individualized Consideration, Intellectual Stimulation, Inspirational Motivation, and Idealized Influence. Idealized Influence means: (14.20.)
A. nurturing; treating follower

C. influencing; acting as positive role models that "walk the walk

Chapter 14, Leadership
A leader's involvement is essential to maximizing worker performance. A leader's success is reflected in: (14.21.)
A. his or her reputation as a leader among leaders
B. the amount he is paid and the loyalty of his followers
C. the s

D. the efficiency, productivity, morale, and enthusiasm demonstrated by followers

Chapter 14, Leadership
Effective leaders realize that failure is one of the greatest learning tools an organization has because: (14.21.)
A. it establishes clear roles and responsibilities
B. failures reinforce the need to follow T.O.s and Local OIs
C. le

C. learning from failure empowers change and inspires efforts to improve

Chapter 14, Leadership
Direction, decisions, and actions are rarely challenged if the leader's intentions are transparent. Transparency is accomplished by: (14.21.)
A. allowing Airmen to fail
B. holding Airmen accountable for their actions
C. showing Airm

D. regular communication, shared decision-making, and healthy debate

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leaders who are flexible listen to other points of view and bend when necessary. Flexibility is an especially valued leadership trait: (14.21.)
A. when time is short
B. when the solution is clear
C. during times of change or improve

C. during times of change or improvement

Chapter 14, Leadership
Promoting accountability in the workplace includes establishing clear roles and responsibilities. Accountability does not focus on discipline and punishment but rather, concentrates on: (14.21.)
A. a strong chain of command
B. docum

C. sustaining a continuously learning environment

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership is setting the example for others by demonstrating positive qualities. The energy that is emitted by leaders to inspire Airmen to perform a task or objective when aspects of a mission are not inherently motivating or comp

D. charisma

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership is setting the example for others by demonstrating positive qualities. Having sympathy and concern for the misfortunes of others is: (14.21.)
A. credibility
B. courage
C. compassion
D. charisma

C. compassion

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership is setting the example for others by demonstrating positive qualities. Addressing sub-standard performance or unacceptable behavior, welcoming new ideas, or doing what is ethically right when others prefer to do otherwise

B. courage

Chapter 14, Leadership
Leadership is setting the example for others by demonstrating positive qualities. The quality of being trusted and believed in is: (14.21.)
A. credibility
B. courage
C. compassion
D. charisma

A. credibility